Spurred, in part, by the COVID-19 pandemic and the need for new ways to reach patients at home, 2023 saw a boom in digital technologies and healthcare solutions: one-stop-shop telemedicine platforms, app-based remote patient monitoring, direct-to-consumer online pharmacies, software-based medical devices, and artificial intelligence/machine learning to bolster delivery of telehealth services. Then came a robust government response. In the EU and UK, regulatory bodies grappled with the introduction of machine learning, AI, and other software into healthcare services by, for example, new guidance from the EU Medical Device Coordination Group and UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency on software medical devices, the EU’s AI Act and the UK government’s AI White paper, the European Medicines Agency reflection paper on use of AI in the product lifecycle, the EU Data Privacy Framework and the equivalent UK-U.S. data bridge, and the European Health Data Space

We call this the “Race to Regulate.” This push-pull dynamic between digital health innovation and government regulation is key to evaluating regulatory risks in today’s shifting legal landscape. This digest seeks to keep up with these changes and provide you with an overview of the key guidelines and developments as the landscape develops. As we come to the end of 2023 and publish our latest Digest, join us on December 13 as we unpack pivotal moments in the 2023 Race to Regulate and discuss what’s next for virtual and digital health. Continue Reading Virtual and Digital Health Digest and webinar

The spread of SARS-CoV-2 has created an urgent need to scale up the production and supply of essential medical equipment, including so-called Rapidly Manufactured Ventilator Systems (RMVSs), to treat COVID-19 patients. To help meet this challenge, the UK government announced on 3 April 2020 that it will indemnify designers and manufacturers of RMVSs for claims relating to infringement of third-party intellectual property (IP) rights and for product liability claims resulting from defective equipment.

Formal notification of the two indemnities was given by the Minister for the Cabinet Office, Michael Gove, to the Public Accounts Committee on 3 April 2020.[1] In the notice, Minister Grove noted that he could not give the normal fourteen sitting days’ notice because “commercial negotiations have only just concluded and contract signature did not allow further delay”. Details of the terms of the referenced agreement have not, however, been provided, as they were said to be commercially sensitive and would continue to be until negotiations had been finalised. It is therefore not yet clear who are the parties to the agreement, whether any cap will apply to the indemnities, whether the government will offer the same terms across the board, or whether it will negotiate them in individual supply agreements.Continue Reading UK Government Offers IP Indemnity to Designers and Manufacturers of Ventilators for COVID-19 Patients

Opinion of the CJEU Advocate-General in Case C-581/18 RB v TÜV Rheinland LGA Products GmbH, Allianz IAED SA: application of the principle of non-discrimination on grounds of nationality in a medical device case.

Background

The effects of the Poly Implant Prothèse SA (PIP) defective breast implant scandal continue to be felt almost ten years since it first came to light that PIP had fraudulently used cheaper, industrial grade silicone in the implants that it manufactured. Due to PIP’s insolvency, those affected have attempted to obtain compensation from other sources, including the relevant notified body, TÜV Rheinland,[1] on the basis that this body had negligently certified PIP’s products and the French regulatory authorities.Continue Reading Medical Devices and Compulsory Insurance in the EU