International recognition

On 21 May 2024, the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) published a statement of policy intent (the Statement) setting out its proposals for international recognition of regulatory “approvals” of medical devices. Under the proposed scheme, medical devices will be subject to limited pre-market requirements where they are already “approved” in a trusted jurisdiction. This will replace the current provisions, which permit recognition of EU CE marks, and will expand recognition to a wider set of trusted regulators, including the US in certain cases. This has long been an intention of the MHRA, and follows a similar procedure for medicines announced last year, although the practicalities of how this will work for devices and the role of the relevant stakeholders has been difficult to resolve.

The proposals are intended to avoid duplication of assessments for medical devices and it is hoped this will lead to quicker access to new devices in Great Britain. It will also allow the MHRA to meet its stated aim of focusing resources on innovative devices, particularly artificial intelligence medical devices (AIMD) that are excluded from the scheme.  However, the Statement is silent on who will undertake the reviews required under the access routes. This is subject to ongoing consultation, though it seems likely that any reviews would be conducted by UK Approved Bodies. This will require coordination between Approved Bodies and the MHRA, which will be an important step in ensuring this scheme operates as intended.

The MHRA intends that the new recognition scheme will come into force at the same time as the future core changes to the medical devices regulatory framework in Great Britain, discussed in a previous post. It is expected the draft regulations implementing that scheme will be published later this year, with the regulations coming into force in 2025.Continue Reading MHRA outlines proposals for international recognition of medical devices

We set out in a previous post that the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) intends to introduce a new international recognition procedure (IRP) for medicinal products, whereby decisions taken in certain countries could be recognised by the MHRA to fast-track approval in the UK.

On 30 August 2023, the MHRA published detailed guidance on how it will use the IRP for medicinal products. The IRP will be open to applicants who have already received an authorisation for the same product from one of the MHRA’s specified Reference Regulators (RRs) in Australia, Canada, the European Union, Japan, Switzerland, Singapore and the United States. However, the MHRA retains the right to reject the IRP and conduct a full assessment if considered necessary.

This procedure will operate in parallel to the MHRA’s current national procedures, including the shortened 150-day timetable, offering applicants a range of authorisation routes depending on the status in other countries and type of application. The hope is that this will allow the MHRA to be able to use the decisions in other countries, while still being able to conduct its own assessment where necessary for the UK market.

The IRP will be available from 1 January 2024. However, until the Windsor framework is in place on 1 January 2025, discussed here, products falling within the scope of the EU Centralised Procedure can only be authorised in Great Britain (England, Scotland and Wales).Continue Reading New UK International Recognition Framework for Medicines

On 26 May 2023, the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) announced plans to introduce new international recognition routes for medicines, whereby the MHRA can recognise decisions to authorise medicinal products taken in other countries so the MHRA can fast track approval in the UK. Further, on 4 July 2023, the MHRA published its Corporate Plan, 2023 to 2026 (Corporate Plan) outlining its four strategic priorities over the next three years, including to “deliver scientific and regulatory excellence through strategic partnerships” through, for example, collaboration with international regulatory partners.

The new international recognition routes will enable recognition of medicinal product approvals in Australia, Canada, the European Union, Japan, Switzerland, Singapore and the United States.

The aim is for these routes to be in place by the first quarter of 2024.Continue Reading New UK International Recognition Routes for Medicines